Habana Libre/The End Exhibition, Staley Wise Gallery, NY, Dec 8-Jan 28, 2012

Solo Exhibition

Michael Dweck Exhibition, Stephan Keszler Gallery, Southampton, Sep 13-Oct 4, 2008

Solo Exhibition

Michael Dweck Exhibition, Maruani & Noirhomme Gallery, Belgium, March 1-April 13, 2008

Solo Exhibition

Michael Dweck Exhibition, Maruani & Noirhomme Gallery, Belgium, March 1-April 13, 2008

Solo Exhibition

Michael Dweck 15 Years, Sotheby's NY, Sept 29-Oct 2, 2018

Solo Exhibition

Michael Dweck 15 Years, Sotheby's NY, Sept 29-Oct 2, 2018

Solo Exhibition

The End: Montauk, N.Y., Sotheby's New York, September 16-18, 2003

Solo Exhibition

Habana Libre/The End Exhibition, Staley Wise Gallery, NY, Dec 8-Jan 28, 2012

Solo Exhibition

The End: Montauk, N.Y.

Virtual Exhibition

The End: Montauk, N.Y.

Virtual Exhibition

Surf's Up 1, Camp Hero, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Adriana at the Panoramic View, Hither Hills, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surf Dog, Ditch Plains, 2002

Chromogenic print

Lilla VIII, Napeague, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Sonya, Poles, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Carlson's tattoo, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

David and Pam in their Caddy (1966), Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Brittany and Julia (Après Surf), Hither Hills, 2012

Gelatin silver print

Tom, Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Airstream, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Ditch Plains Surf Contest, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surf's up 16 / Carime & Camila at Camp Hero, Montauk, 2006

Chromogenic print

Ray, Poles, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Shark trophy at Salivars, Montauk 2002

Gelatin silver print

Kurt's Sticks, Southampton, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surfing the Break, Terrace, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surfer, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Lilla, Napeague, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Old Boards in Tony's backyard, Fort Pond Bay, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Lilla, Hula, Napeague, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Jessica, Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Jessica and Kurt, Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Sonya getting changed in Gilles's truck, Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Wendy at the Panoramic View, Hither Hills, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Skater 2, Ditch Plains, 2006

Chromogenic print

Waiting, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surfing, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Boards, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Lilla, Napeague (Squat), 2002

Gelatin silver print

Jessica and Kurt at Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Laying Out, Turtle Cove, 2012

Gelatin silver print

Water Fight, Hither Hills, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Beach Dog, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Frenchy, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Montauk Cliffs, 2002

Chromogenic print

Dirt Road, Montauk, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Bonfire, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Clouds, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Flag at Snug Harbor, Montauk, NY, 2002

Chromogenic print

Lifeguards, 1997

Gelatin silver print

Blue Sky 2, 2002

Chromogenic print

Jamie, Trailer Park, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surf Car, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

East Deck Motel, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Shadmoor Cliffs

Gelatin silver print

Surfing The Ranch, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Getting Ready, Montauk, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Ditch Witch, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Morning surf at Poles, 2012

Gelatin silver print

Let's Go, Camp Hero, 2006

Chromogenic print

Getting Wet (Surf's Up 8), Cavett's Cove, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Dune Grass, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Natalie on the Rocks, Camp Hero, 2008

Gelatin silver print

Kelly at Ditch Plains

Gelatin silver print

Cavett's Cove, 2012

Gelatin silver print

Cooling Off, Turtle Cove, 2012

Gelatin silver print

Jamie Leigh 2, 2006

Chromogenic print

Victor's Yard, Montauk, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Ronjo, Montauk, 2002

Chromogenic print

Jessica and Kurt at Trailer Park 2, 2002

Gelatin silver print

The Love Bug, abandoned on Montauk Highway, 2002

Chromogenic print

Skateboarding, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Jamie, Ditch Plains, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Ginelle Parking Lot Triptych, 2002

Gelatin silver print

Surf's Up 3 / Jamie, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Surf's Up 19 / Camila on the Rocks, Camp Hero Montauk, 2006

Chromogenic print

Yellow Board, 2006

Chromogenic print

Magic Light, 2006

Chromogenic print

Wild Child 4, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Swing, 2006

Gelatin silver print

Room 74-5, 2006

Chromogenic print

Room 74-7, 2006

Chromogenic print

Yellow Board, Pin-up Polaroid 1, 2006

Unique Large-Format Polaroid Polacolor Print

Magic Light, Pin-up Polaroid 4, 2006

Unique Large-Format Polaroid Polacolor Print

Room 74-5, Pin-up Polaroid 19, 2006

Unique Large-Format Polaroid Polacolor Print

My Red Pick-up 2, Pin-up Polaroid 20, 2006

Unique Large-Format Polaroid Polacolor Print

The End: Montauk, N.Y. Essay by Christopher Sweet

Michael Dweck’s first major photographic work was published in volume form as The End: Montauk, N.Y., in 2004, and was featured in several exhibitions and art fairs that year. The work portrays the old fishing community of Montauk and its surfing subculture. It is an evocation of a real-world paradise lost: the paradise of summer, youth, and erotic possibility — an American version of the Arcadian vision. Blending nostalgia, fantasy, and documentation the photographs present a compelling portrait of a place in time and a way of life at once fading and being reinvented with each new season.

The signature photograph of the collection, Sonya, Poles, is an image of ecstatic summer. A beautiful young woman in full naked glory — her blond hair blown back, her breasts aloft, a smile of anticipation — bounds across a glistening beach, a surfboard under her arm, toward the incoming waves. In the far distance — in the upper margin of the picture — waves and dunes, surf and scrub fringe the horizon line which divides her head from her body. Her face is profiled against the great sky, and her dynamic body against the flat expanse of wet sand. All the bliss of summer fun and youthful promise is summed up by her scissor kick, reiterated by her shadow and her reflection, a vivacious “v” form that becomes a faceted diamond cleaved from light. And that bolt of white, her surfboard, like a missile, will carve out the place on the wave that will bear her back over the beating tide like a goddess from the sea.

A tattered Old Glory flaps in the wind, an abandoned VW camper sits near the side of the road, beached like a dead whale, its former glory as a Love Bug long lost. Cars pull up in the parking lot near the beach. People slip out of their t-shirts and jeans and into bathing suits. The gear is unloaded. The tribe gathers. Aging sybarites ponder their past glories while oblivious, feckless youth in full flower frolics on the beach, cavorts in the water, sits out on the gentle swells waiting for waves, or makes mischief up at the motel or back at the cottage. Old timers measure the days, the years not by how far they have come, but how close they have remained and yet how much the place and they have changed, how much the weeds have grown up around them like the abandoned camper. An old surfboard, left under a house some twenty, thirty years before finds its original owner just down the road. At night the luau begins and the girls in grass skirts tease the men and boys. And the pleasures of the night beckon.

A few old timers show up, hang out, nowhere else to go, not part of the party but regulars on the scene. They add a little texture, lend a bit of character – like relics and artifacts – and are tolerated, at times perhaps indulged, as long as they don’t bother the girls. They serve as reminders that the past is not just the sound of receding trumpets. The years roll on like the tides, the seasons turn, and each summer brings its own story. With each new year, there is some new development, new blood, and more and more the hazard of new fortunes changing the balance and tone. New arrivals take it as they find it. Only the lifers, of one sort or another, bear the burden of how things ought to be, how things used to be.

Michael Dweck’s The End: Montauk, N.Y., is a private Idaho, a personal Eden, at once remembered and imagined. The Arcadian setting is a place for recreation, self-invention, and the celebration of physical beauty and well-being and the tender temptations of the flesh. It is a down-home beach paradise of a distinctly American variety, Endless Summer, that blessed but all too brief interlude that separates the seasons of school and work, adolescence and adulthood. Dweck’s vision of the far end of the island mingles the yearnings and anxieties of youth and age, of callowness and conscience, the exuberance of one’s salad days and the frisson of old bachelors. The season in the sun in due course passes into autumn. Youth and beauty blush, exude their sweetness, exert their power, but inevitably falter and fade before the onslaught of the years under the overarching, ozone-depleted sky. Our times are not in our hands. The eviction notice is tied to the gate, even as one enters, and the unease of that knowledge hovers over the good fun. The golden youth of one summer is the worldly-wise veteran or the broken old timer of another. The End is an elegy to the evanescence of youth and an ode to the consolation of art.

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